What we Treat

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is irritation of the median nerve as it passes through the carpal tunnel at your wrist. The median nerve provides signals to the muscles in the forearm and hand causing them to move, as well as providing the hand with sensation to the thumb, index finger, middle finger and half of the ring finger. As the median nerve passes into the hand it passes through the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel houses a number of tendons, connective tissue and the median nerve.

If the carpal tunnel narrows or becomes irritated, it can cause irritation to the structures that pass through it, especially the median nerve. If the median nerve becomes irritated or compressed then the patient will experience neural symptoms into the area of the hand that it provides sensation and movement. This may include pins and needles, numbness, deep aching pain or loss in movement. The median nerve needs to be able to glide within its sheath in the carpal tunnel as the wrist moves, however with long term compression to the nerve, scarring can develop. When the nerve becomes scarred it will adhere to other tissue close to it, inhibiting its ability to glide and move within the carpal tunnel. This will cause irritation and the symptoms above may become apparent.

What Causes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

There are a number of different contributing factors to CTS and it is believed that it is a combination of factors which predispose the nerve to become irritated. These contributing factors include:

How can Physiotherapy help with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Physiotherapy can be extremely beneficial in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, whether it is with or without surgery. After a thorough assessment by one of our highly qualified Physiotherapists it will become clear which treatment methods will be beneficial to you in improving your symptoms. Physiotherapy can target a number of the different contributing factors including tight connective tissue, tight muscles, poor posture and nerve irritation, through a variety of treatment techniques to improve the symptoms. These can be used for patients who are suffering with CTS both before and after surgery. As mentioned above it may be appropriate to undergo surgery for the CTS or be administered with a corticosteroid injection. The surgery is performed under local anaesthetic using a keyhole (arthroscopic) procedure. This reduces post-operative complications and ensures a quicker recovery. The surgery is designed to reduce pressure on the median nerve within the carpal tunnel through releasing part of the transverse carpal ligament. It is extremely important to see a physiotherapist after surgery to ensure optimal tissue repair and reduce post-operative complications.

Treatment techniques that can be used by physiotherapists when treating CTS include:

If surgery is required, it is usually performed under local anaesthetic using a keyhole (arthroscopic) procedure. This reduces post-operative complications and ensures a quicker recovery. The surgery is designed to reduce pressure on the median nerve within the carpal tunnel through releasing part of the transverse carpal ligament. It is extremely important to see a physiotherapist after surgery to ensure optimal tissue repair and reduce post-operative complications.

If you would like to discuss your problem before booking an appointment please give our physiotherapy team a call, we will do our best to help.